Connected Regeneration for a Better Tomorrow – FREE MOVIE

Without question, all things are interconnected. As John Muir, the first elected president of the Sierra Club, explained:

When we try to pick out anything by itself, we find it hitched to everything else in the Universe.

In other words, we are all interdendent on everything else. My paraphrase of what Jane Benyus of Biomimicry Institute demonstrates, a life well lived is one that makes life more livable. In other words, we live a life that make it better for everyone and everything. More about Jane Benyus’s work and Biomimicry is available at this post: Parallel NOT Linear Means Create Positive AND Prevent Negative

This week Ocean Robbins of the Food Revolution Network promoted FREE access to a movie, “The Need to GROW“. This movie demonstrates and emphasizes these interconnection attributes of life on earth and and how they can be used to make life better for all.

The movie demonstrates multiple ways to improve our life that also will diminish problems. To me, it is important to understand, these actions will make our life better today and also make a better tomorrow more likely.

Know that these benefits are not deferred, they are immediate. We feel better right away, we become part of the solution and not part of the problem. It is an emotionally powerful way to practice paneugenesis.

Here is the trailer.

To practice paneugenesis is to generate comprehensive improvements to creating pervasive, reciprocal, selfish, selfless, synergistic interactions so everyone and everything benefits. Why would we do anything else?

I look forward to hearing how you incorporate these ideas into your life and the related benefits you experience.

I encourage you to get the free access and watch “The Need to GROW” at this link.

Rob Herring, the director, shares this:

 

Please stand with us — telling your friends and loved ones that there is a new film that showcases heartwarming stories and powerful solutions.

You can also give this link to people you know, so they can sign up and join in the free screening too: TheNeedToGROW.com.

Make it a Great Day, Week, Year and Life!

Be Well’r,
Craig Becker

Be selfish, selfless, & synergistic so everyone and everything benefits!

Email me if you want to discuss: 
Email: BeWellr@gmail.com

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It is All about the Ripple…

When we drop a rock in a pond it causes a far reaching ripple.  Our actions also cause a ripple that spreads and has a far reaching ripple or impact.  Drawdown is the by-Product of a better tomorrow. By drawdown, in the book edited by Paul Hawken, they are talking about how to drawdown the carbon emissions that are causing problems.

The actions discussed in the book, “Drawdown: The Most Comprehensive Plan Ever Proposed to Reverse Global Warming“, make a better today and a better tomorrow.  Drawdown is the ripple, not the only impact.  A way to make a better tomorrow, starting today, has been outlined by Paul Hawken and a great group of colleagues. The book itemizes 100 examples of how to start to make this happen.

Chad Frischmans TED Talk below provides a summary of the 100 solutions provided in the book.

I always thought my work and focus has been about how to create a better tomorrow by discovering the most effective, efficient and sustainable way to get what we want that also benefits the future.  The concept is similar to how Rory Vader explains how to multiply time.  As he explains, take action today to make a better tomorrow (see Be Fruitful and Multiply – Time That is…).

As I continue to learn, I realized it is “All about the Ripple”.  To feel good for doing good, the ripple, or long term impact, must also be beneficial.  In other words, to add to Vaden’s goal, to focus actions that can be taken today, that will make a better tomorrow…For Everyone and Everything.”

It is possible to create a better today that also makes a better tomorrow more likely, however traditional ways must be improved.  Drawdown is the “Moneyball (also a Movie of the same name)” or better way for the environment, like Upcycle. Better ways have also been found for education, business, industry, health and policy (see Concept: Create More Good, Not Just Less Bad and Create More Good, Not Just Less Bad (described in video). We can ask ourselves, what ripple happens because of the actions taken?

We are not using the ideas outlined by Hawken and Frischman as commonly as we should because skeptics let us doubt ourselves. To instill doubt they focus on the unknown since we can’t answer ever question. Skeptics have been using the idea of doubt to distort our reality for a corporate agenda.

Krugman recently has gotten so frustrated by this he calls the climate deniers depravers.  That is he is accusing them of moral corruption. I encourage you read his 11-26-2018 article, The Depravity of Climate-Change Denial: Risking civilization for profit, ideology and ego.  I am confused by this approach because doing this means they do not get as many benefits either. These shortsighted approaches leave a lot “on the table”.  More benefits will transpire when the aim is to have a positive ripple beyond the initial impact.

What can be done? Dr. Pinillos, a professor at Arizona State University suggests using  probability in his article, Knowledge, Ignorance and Climate Change.  As he explains, because we can’t know everything and we also know that we don’t know everything, he recommends we “…to stop talking about “knowledge” and switch to talking about probabilities”.  As he explains, “…people in the grips of skepticism are often still willing to accept the objective probabilities…”

Plans are not perfect and no matter how smart or educated we are, what we don’t know far surpasses anything we know. Socrates taught us the virtue of recognizing our limitations. The ideas presented by Paul Hawken and Chris Frischman are ones we should already be using so lets get started using them and continue to collect data about those actions and improve as needed. In other words, plot our progress and if it is not happening, we must optimize the process again ( see Improve when Predict, Observe, Get Feedback, and Adjust.

Doing this isn’t always easy.  It is easy to be against something, fight against a perceived injustice or what seems wrong. Although doing this is morally correct and necessary, it is mostly action to stop something.  Then what?  Being for something takes more effort to persistently develop, design and implement and continually improve a better way that not only is initially good, but also has A POSITIVE RIPPLE.

So what am I doing, I am going on offense by working toward renewing, rebuilding, restoring, and building  a better life.  Not just a less bad life, but a better life than where we are.  This isn’t about putting out fires to get us back where we were, it is about redesign to create a new and better reality that makes life better today and tomorrow. We must exceed expectations!

Joining these efforts, not only means you get to experience the benefits a better world, you get the intrinsic rush of knowing you contributed toward everyone and everything doing better. Please share your thoughts. I look forward to hearing about the how you practice paneugenesis so you will generate all good by creating pervasive, reciprocal, selfish, selfless, synergistic interactions so everyone and everything benefits.

Be Well’r,
Craig Becker

Be selfish, selfless, & synergistic so everyone and everything benefits!

If you want to contact me:
Email: BeWellr@gmail.com

 

Do we need an Independent Referee for Life?

For some time I have been thinking about the importance of perceived fairness.  Evidence suggests fairness is innate because we see it in very young children.  I also believe I have seen the concept of fairness in my dogs.  Is it a law such that even dogs want fairness?

As I had been thinking about it, I learned about Michael Lewis’s new Podcast, Against the Rules. This podcast promotes itself by explaining how it will “…look at what’s happened to fairness.  The podcasts look in financial markets, newsrooms, basketball games, courts of laws and much more.  He asks, what happens to a world where everyone hate the referee?”  I have only listened to a few, however what I have heard have been great!

To me, fairness is a basic necessity or a precursor to being able to do better than what is expected or what have been called best practices. For me fairness is the 0 I emphasize in my exceeding expectations video (below).

Please share your thoughts about how we can build fairness into our daily lives so people don’t feel cheated.  When things aren’t fair, everybody loses something because the cumulative benefits, though tilted toward one party, will still be less for all.  I will continue to work at generating comprehensive improvements beyond just being fair through the creation of pervasive, reciprocal, selfish, selfless, synergistic interactions so everyone and everything benefits, or by practicing paneugenesis.  I look forward to hearing about the how you help generate all good for everyone and everything.

If you want to contact me:
Email: BeWellr@gmail.com

Chronic Wellness Article Published

Planting a Tree Model for Public Health: Shifting the Paradigm Toward Chronic Wellness

  • April 2019; DOI: 10.1080/19325037.2019.1590260

With the leadership of Dr. Michael Stellefson, we were able to publish this article.  Using ideas proposed with Paneugenesis, Dr. Stellefson clearly outlined how these ideas can facilitate “Chronic Wellness” which we defined as:

Persistent positive conditions enabled through engagement in health-causing actions

The article explains how health education can work in the eco-sytstem of health like trees function in our physcial environment to provide a life giving force.

Abstract
Though the U.S. health care system is among the best in the developed world, access to chronic care remains a problem for many, in part, because the system is not ideally suited to treat long-term conditions. Consequently, economic and societal costs associated with chronic disease are rising rapidly. To complement traditional pathogenic chronic disease management strategies, Health Education specialists should consider incorporating salutogenic methods that promote chronic wellness. We define chronic wellness as persistent, positive conditions enabled through engagement in health-causing actions. This commentary proposes a public health tree model that seeks to nurture inclusive interactions in a health-promoting ecosystem that fosters chronic wellness: Assessment (ie, “roots” of public health interventions that appraise idealized health outcomes), policy development (ie, “trunk” of public health that helps support positive health outcomes), research and evaluation (ie, “branches” of evidence-based public health that apply scientific methods to engage and learn about health in community, school, health care, and organizational settings), and assurance (ie, “leaves” that reinforce policies to nurture continually improving environmental determinants of health). Adopting a public health tree model could lead to more efficient and effective services for many, including those at risk of devloping or living with chronic disease.

Please share your thoughts.  I will continue to work at generating comprehensive improvements through the creation of pervasive, reciprocal, selfish, selfless, synergistic interactions so everyone and everything benefits, or by practicing paneugenesis.  I look forward to hearing about the how you help generate all good for everyone and everything.

Be Well’r,
Craig Becker

Be selfish, selfless, & synergistic so everyone and everything benefits!

If you want to contact me:
Email: BeWellr@gmail.com

Science, Beauty, Evolution, and Progress

This post was inspired and improved by information provided by Kerry Sewell. Thank you Kerry.

I am constantly reading and listening to presentations to learn new things.  As I learn I am awed by what I learn and how everyone and everything is interconnected.  Recently I listened to an interesting RadioLab presentation and 2 TED Talks and they all seemed to tell an interconnected story.

To start the story,  Phil Plait ‘s TED talk, The secret to scientific discoveries? Making mistakes,(see below) provided a fresh perspective on science.  He reminds us that mistakes are part of the scientific process.  He also suggests that many people misunderstand science because they  think that “…science is just a big pile of facts.” He emphasizes the problem with this belief is not only that it is wrong, but that collected facts are not even a goal of science.  He then explains how the process of science provides humans with the best chance to learn about our reality, objectively.  Next he explains what most of us know, but fail to admit, “…people are flawed” and easily fooled. Science is valuable because it provides a method to be objective  (for more about our difficulty seeing things accurately see, Innate Gullibility Highlights the Value of Predictability)

Science helps because it gives us a process that minimizes our biases so we can see reality more clearly. I encourage you to listen to his presentation below.

Next, an interesting RadioLab discussion about The Beauty Puzzle (show linked) challenged the evolutionary scientific idea of fitness as the determining factor.  In other words, it suggests we may have made a mistake.  This hypothesis suggests beauty or aesthetics, not survival of the fittest, is the determining factor, and that the ’survival of the fittest’ paradigm was a deliberate perversion of Darwin’s original theory..

 

 

The evidence providedfor this hypothesis,, while it has some merit, for me, provides an unconvincing alternative.  The discussion did not factor in the idea of mental illusions or mistakes in the scientific process as discussed by Phil Plait.  Nor did it take into account mental illusions as outlined by Kahneman and Tversky. (see Undoing Needed because Mental Illusions Impact Us)   As I understand it, evolution is an ongoing big experiment and not all experiments are successful.  Their examples may represent some experiments that may contribute but may not be successful. Possibly, or maybe…

Then I heard Marjan van Aubel‘s TED Presentation about solar energy, The beautiful future of solar power.  She suggest beauty may in fact be the determining factor for OUR survival.  In his presentation she explains the importance of aesthetics or beauty and suggests it as necessity if we are to adopt and use the power of the sun.

All together these interesting presentations seem to recommend for us to progress toward a better tomorrow using study, science, experiments, and mistakes to learn how to contribute to a more beautiful tomorrow.

Please share your thoughts.  I will continue to attempt to push evolution with science by creating more beauty through the generation of comprehensive improvements from the creation of pervasive, reciprocal, selfish, selfless, synergistic interactions so everyone and everything benefits, or by practicing paneugenesis.  I look forward to hearing about the how you help generate all good for everyone and everything.

Be Well’r,
Craig Becker

Be selfish, selfless, & synergistic so everyone and everything benefits!

If you want to contact me:
Email: BeWellr@gmail.com

Boredom & Parenting Vindication – Sort of…

I have been reading and digesting Steven Pinker’s book, “Enlightenment Now“, which is fantastic and will be posting about that and Robert Reich’s excellent book, “The Common Good” soon.  As I work on that post, I am sharing an interesting article about boredom and children.

This NYT article,”Let Children Got Bored Again” by Leo Espinosa , caught my attention because I have often felt guilty for often saying to my daughters when they were bored, “Boredom is a choice.”  I was telling them they can do anything, they must choose to do something of interest.  The article explains this better – enjoy…

Let Children Get Bored Again

Boredom teaches us that life isn’t a parade of amusements. More important, it spawns creativity and self-sufficiency.

by Leo Espinosa

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“I’m bored.” It’s a puny little phrase, yet it has the power to fill parents with a cascade of dread, annoyance and guilt. If someone around here is bored, someone else must have failed to enlighten or enrich or divert. And how can anyone — child or adult — claim boredom when there’s so much that can and should be done? Immediately.

But boredom is something to experience rather than hastily swipe away. And not as some kind of cruel Victorian conditioning, recommended because it’s awful and toughens you up. Despite the lesson most adults learned growing up — boredom is for boring people — boredom is useful. It’s good for you.

If kids don’t figure this out early on, they’re in for a nasty surprise. School, let’s face it, can be dull, and it isn’t actually the teacher’s job to entertain as well as educate. Life isn’t meant to be an endless parade of amusements. “That’s right,” a mother says to her daughter in Maria Semple’s 2012 novel, “Where’d You Go, Bernadette.” “You are bored. And I’m going to let you in on a little secret about life. You think it’s boring now? Well, it only gets more boring. The sooner you learn it’s on you to make life interesting, the better off you’ll be.”

People used to accept that much of life was boring. Memoirs of pre-21st-century life are rife with tedium. When not idling in drawing rooms, members of the leisured class took long walks and stared at trees. They went motoring and stared at more trees. Those who had to work had it a lot harder. Agricultural and industrial jobs were often mind-numbing; few people were looking to be fulfilled by paid labor. Children could expect those kinds of futures and they got used to the idea from an early age, left unattended with nothing but bookshelves and tree branches, and later, bad afternoon television.

Only a few short decades ago, during the lost age of underparenting, grown-ups thought a certain amount of boredom was appropriate. And children came to appreciate their empty agendas. In an interview with GQ magazine, Lin-Manuel Miranda credited his unattended afternoons with fostering inspiration. “Because there is nothing better to spur creativity than a blank page or an empty bedroom,” he said.

Nowadays, subjecting a child to such inactivity is viewed as a dereliction of parental duty. In a much-read story in The Times, “The Relentlessness of Modern Parenting,” Claire Cain Miller cited a recent study that found that regardless of class, income or race, parents believed that “children who were bored after school should be enrolled in extracurricular activities, and that parents who were busy should stop their task and draw with their children if asked.”

Every spare moment is to be optimized, maximized, driven toward a goal.

When not being uberparented, kids today are left to their own devices — their own digital devices, that is. Parents preparing for a long car ride or airplane trip are like Army officers plotting a complicated land maneuver. Which movies to load onto the iPad? Should we start a new family-friendly podcast? Is this an O.K. time to let the kids play Fortnite until their brains melt into the back seat? What did parents in the ’70s do when kids were bored in the way-back? Nothing! They let them breathe in gas fumes. Torture their siblings. And since it wasn’t actually for wearing, play with the broken seatbelt.

If you complained about being bored back then, you were really asking for it. “Go outside,” you might get, or worse, “Clean your room.” Was this fun? No. Was it helpful? Yes.

Because things happen when you’re bored. Some of the most boring jobs I’ve had were also the most creative. Working at an import factory after school, I pasted photos of ugly Peruvian sweaters onto sales sheets. My hands became encrusted with glue as the sweaters blurred into a clumpy sameness. For some reason, everything smelled like molasses. My mind had no choice but to drift into an elaborate fantasy realm. It’s when you are bored that stories set in. Checking out groceries at the supermarket, I invented narratives around people’s purchases. The man buying eggplant and a six-pack of Bud at 9 p.m.: Which was the must-get item and which the impulse purchase? How did my former fifth-grade teacher feel about my observing her weekly purchase of Nutter Butters?

Once you’ve truly settled into the anesthetizing effects of boredom, you find yourself en route to discovery. With monotony, small differences begin to emerge, between those trees, those sweaters. This is why so many useful ideas occur in the shower, when you’re held captive to a mundane activity. You let your mind wander and follow it where it goes.

Of course, it’s not really the boredom itself that’s important; it’s what we do with it. When you reach your breaking point, boredom teaches you to respond constructively, to make something happen for yourself. But unless we are faced with a steady diet of stultifying boredom, we never learn how.

The idea isn’t that you suffer through crushing tedium indefinitely like Neville (“N is for Neville who died of ennui”) of “The Gashlycrumb Tinies.” It’s that you learn how to vanquish it. This may come in several forms: You might turn inward and use the time to think. You might reach for a book. You might imagine your way to a better job. Boredom leads to flights of fancy. But ultimately, to self-discipline. To resourcefulness.

The ability to handle boredom, not surprisingly, is correlated with the ability to focus and to self-regulate. Research has shown that people with attention disorders are particularly prone to boredom. It makes sense that in a hyperstimulating world, what at first seems captivating now feels less so; what was once mildly diverting may now be flat-out dull.

It’s especially important that kids get bored — and be allowed to stay bored — when they’re young. That it not be considered “a problem” to be avoided or eradicated by the higher-ups, but instead something kids grapple with on their own.

We’ve stopped training children to do this. Rather than teach them to absorb material that is slower, duller and decidedly two-dimensional, like a lot of worthwhile information is, schools cave in to what they say children expect: fun. Teachers spend more time concocting ways to “engage” students through visuals and “interactive learning” (read: screens, games) tailored to their Candy Crushed attention spans. Kids won’t listen to long lectures, goes the argument, so it’s on us to serve up learning in easier-to-swallow portions.

But surely teaching children to endure boredom rather than ratcheting up the entertainment will prepare them for a more realistic future, one that doesn’t raise false expectations of what work or life itself actually entails. One day, even in a job they otherwise love, our kids may have to spend an entire day answering Friday’s leftover email. They may have to check spreadsheets. Or assist robots at a vast internet-ready warehouse.

This sounds boring, you might conclude. It sounds like work, and it sounds like life. Perhaps we should get used to it again, and use it to our benefit. Perhaps in an incessant, up-the-ante world, we could do with a little less excitement.

Pamela Paul is the editor of the Book Review and a co-author of the forthcoming book “How to Raise a Reader.”

Follow The New York Times Opinion section on Facebook, Twitter (@NYTopinion) and Instagram.

Pamela Paul is the editor of the Book Review and oversees books coverage at The Times. She is the author of five books, “By the Book,” “Parenting, Inc.,” “Pornified,” “The Starter Marriage and the Future of Matrimony” and most recently, “My Life with Bob: Flawed Heroine Keeps Book of Books, Plot Ensues.” @PamelaPaulNYTFacebook

 

Boredom may create health promotion gains. Please share your thoughts on how you will take action to help create a better tomorrow.

Be Well’r,
Craig Becker

Be selfish, selfless, & synergistic so everyone and everything benefits!

Contact me at:
Email: BeWellr@gmail.com

 

More about “HOW”…To Create All Good

These are 2 great presentations. Barry Schwartz made a fantastic 2009 TED presentation I encourage you to watch.  It is even more relevant today than it was in 2009.  To me much of what he says is at the heart of Practicing Paneugenesis or generating all good.  The presentation explains what is necessary, possibly precursors to creating pervasive, reciprocal, selfish, selfless, synergistic interactions so everyone and everything benefits.  Enjoy and please write back to share your thoughts.

 

 

This next presentation by Chad Freshman: 100 Solutions to Reverse Global Warming.  As he points out, the ideas associated with “draw down” not only does this reverse our problem, they are solutions from which everyone benefits.  As he state near the end,

But here’s the great thing. We would want to implement these solutions whether or not global warming was even a problem, because they have cascading benefits to human and planetary well-being. Renewable electricity results in clean, abundant access to energy for all. A plant-rich diet, reduced food waste results in a healthy global population with enough food and sustenance.Family planning and educating girls? This is about human rights, about gender equality. This is about economic improvement and the freedom of choice..

In other words, reversing global warming is a by-product of creating all good.  Now that is Practicing Paneugenesis.  Enjoy.

 

 

Please share your thoughts on how you will take action to help create a better tomorrow.

Be Well’r,
Craig Becker

Be selfish, selfless, & synergistic so everyone and everything benefits!

Contact me at:
Email: BeWellr@gmail.com

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