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It is All about the Ripple…

When we drop a rock in a pond it causes a far reaching ripple.  Our actions also cause a ripple that spreads and has a far reaching ripple or impact.  Drawdown is the by-Product of a better tomorrow. By drawdown, in the book edited by Paul Hawken, they are talking about how to drawdown the carbon emissions that are causing problems.

The actions discussed in the book, “Drawdown: The Most Comprehensive Plan Ever Proposed to Reverse Global Warming“, make a better today and a better tomorrow.  Drawdown is the ripple, not the only impact.  A way to make a better tomorrow, starting today, has been outlined by Paul Hawken and a great group of colleagues. The book itemizes 100 examples of how to start to make this happen.

Chad Frischmans TED Talk below provides a summary of the 100 solutions provided in the book.

I always thought my work and focus has been about how to create a better tomorrow by discovering the most effective, efficient and sustainable way to get what we want that also benefits the future.  The concept is similar to how Rory Vader explains how to multiply time.  As he explains, take action today to make a better tomorrow (see Be Fruitful and Multiply – Time That is…).

As I continue to learn, I realized it is “All about the Ripple”.  To feel good for doing good, the ripple, or long term impact, must also be beneficial.  In other words, to add to Vaden’s goal, to focus actions that can be taken today, that will make a better tomorrow…For Everyone and Everything.”

It is possible to create a better today that also makes a better tomorrow more likely, however traditional ways must be improved.  Drawdown is the “Moneyball (also a Movie of the same name)” or better way for the environment, like Upcycle. Better ways have also been found for education, business, industry, health and policy (see Concept: Create More Good, Not Just Less Bad and Create More Good, Not Just Less Bad (described in video). We can ask ourselves, what ripple happens because of the actions taken?

We are not using the ideas outlined by Hawken and Frischman as commonly as we should because skeptics let us doubt ourselves. To instill doubt they focus on the unknown since we can’t answer ever question. Skeptics have been using the idea of doubt to distort our reality for a corporate agenda.

Krugman recently has gotten so frustrated by this he calls the climate deniers depravers.  That is he is accusing them of moral corruption. I encourage you read his 11-26-2018 article, The Depravity of Climate-Change Denial: Risking civilization for profit, ideology and ego.  I am confused by this approach because doing this means they do not get as many benefits either. These shortsighted approaches leave a lot “on the table”.  More benefits will transpire when the aim is to have a positive ripple beyond the initial impact.

What can be done? Dr. Pinillos, a professor at Arizona State University suggests using  probability in his article, Knowledge, Ignorance and Climate Change.  As he explains, because we can’t know everything and we also know that we don’t know everything, he recommends we “…to stop talking about “knowledge” and switch to talking about probabilities”.  As he explains, “…people in the grips of skepticism are often still willing to accept the objective probabilities…”

Plans are not perfect and no matter how smart or educated we are, what we don’t know far surpasses anything we know. Socrates taught us the virtue of recognizing our limitations. The ideas presented by Paul Hawken and Chris Frischman are ones we should already be using so lets get started using them and continue to collect data about those actions and improve as needed. In other words, plot our progress and if it is not happening, we must optimize the process again ( see Improve when Predict, Observe, Get Feedback, and Adjust.

Doing this isn’t always easy.  It is easy to be against something, fight against a perceived injustice or what seems wrong. Although doing this is morally correct and necessary, it is mostly action to stop something.  Then what?  Being for something takes more effort to persistently develop, design and implement and continually improve a better way that not only is initially good, but also has A POSITIVE RIPPLE.

So what am I doing, I am going on offense by working toward renewing, rebuilding, restoring, and building  a better life.  Not just a less bad life, but a better life than where we are.  This isn’t about putting out fires to get us back where we were, it is about redesign to create a new and better reality that makes life better today and tomorrow. We must exceed expectations!

Joining these efforts, not only means you get to experience the benefits a better world, you get the intrinsic rush of knowing you contributed toward everyone and everything doing better. Please share your thoughts. I look forward to hearing about the how you practice paneugenesis so you will generate all good by creating pervasive, reciprocal, selfish, selfless, synergistic interactions so everyone and everything benefits.

Be Well’r,
Craig Becker

Be selfish, selfless, & synergistic so everyone and everything benefits!

If you want to contact me:
Email: BeWellr@gmail.com

 

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Do we need an Independent Referee for Life?

For some time I have been thinking about the importance of perceived fairness.  Evidence suggests fairness is innate because we see it in very young children.  I also believe I have seen the concept of fairness in my dogs.  Is it a law such that even dogs want fairness?

As I had been thinking about it, I learned about Michael Lewis’s new Podcast, Against the Rules. This podcast promotes itself by explaining how it will “…look at what’s happened to fairness.  The podcasts look in financial markets, newsrooms, basketball games, courts of laws and much more.  He asks, what happens to a world where everyone hate the referee?”  I have only listened to a few, however what I have heard have been great!

To me, fairness is a basic necessity or a precursor to being able to do better than what is expected or what have been called best practices. For me fairness is the 0 I emphasize in my exceeding expectations video (below).

Please share your thoughts about how we can build fairness into our daily lives so people don’t feel cheated.  When things aren’t fair, everybody loses something because the cumulative benefits, though tilted toward one party, will still be less for all.  I will continue to work at generating comprehensive improvements beyond just being fair through the creation of pervasive, reciprocal, selfish, selfless, synergistic interactions so everyone and everything benefits, or by practicing paneugenesis.  I look forward to hearing about the how you help generate all good for everyone and everything.

If you want to contact me:
Email: BeWellr@gmail.com

Chronic Wellness Article Published

Planting a Tree Model for Public Health: Shifting the Paradigm Toward Chronic Wellness

  • April 2019; DOI: 10.1080/19325037.2019.1590260

With the leadership of Dr. Michael Stellefson, we were able to publish this article.  Using ideas proposed with Paneugenesis, Dr. Stellefson clearly outlined how these ideas can facilitate “Chronic Wellness” which we defined as:

Persistent positive conditions enabled through engagement in health-causing actions

The article explains how health education can work in the eco-sytstem of health like trees function in our physcial environment to provide a life giving force.

Abstract
Though the U.S. health care system is among the best in the developed world, access to chronic care remains a problem for many, in part, because the system is not ideally suited to treat long-term conditions. Consequently, economic and societal costs associated with chronic disease are rising rapidly. To complement traditional pathogenic chronic disease management strategies, Health Education specialists should consider incorporating salutogenic methods that promote chronic wellness. We define chronic wellness as persistent, positive conditions enabled through engagement in health-causing actions. This commentary proposes a public health tree model that seeks to nurture inclusive interactions in a health-promoting ecosystem that fosters chronic wellness: Assessment (ie, “roots” of public health interventions that appraise idealized health outcomes), policy development (ie, “trunk” of public health that helps support positive health outcomes), research and evaluation (ie, “branches” of evidence-based public health that apply scientific methods to engage and learn about health in community, school, health care, and organizational settings), and assurance (ie, “leaves” that reinforce policies to nurture continually improving environmental determinants of health). Adopting a public health tree model could lead to more efficient and effective services for many, including those at risk of devloping or living with chronic disease.

Please share your thoughts.  I will continue to work at generating comprehensive improvements through the creation of pervasive, reciprocal, selfish, selfless, synergistic interactions so everyone and everything benefits, or by practicing paneugenesis.  I look forward to hearing about the how you help generate all good for everyone and everything.

Be Well’r,
Craig Becker

Be selfish, selfless, & synergistic so everyone and everything benefits!

If you want to contact me:
Email: BeWellr@gmail.com

Science, Beauty, Evolution, and Progress

This post was inspired and improved by information provided by Kerry Sewell. Thank you Kerry.

I am constantly reading and listening to presentations to learn new things.  As I learn I am awed by what I learn and how everyone and everything is interconnected.  Recently I listened to an interesting RadioLab presentation and 2 TED Talks and they all seemed to tell an interconnected story.

To start the story,  Phil Plait ‘s TED talk, The secret to scientific discoveries? Making mistakes,(see below) provided a fresh perspective on science.  He reminds us that mistakes are part of the scientific process.  He also suggests that many people misunderstand science because they  think that “…science is just a big pile of facts.” He emphasizes the problem with this belief is not only that it is wrong, but that collected facts are not even a goal of science.  He then explains how the process of science provides humans with the best chance to learn about our reality, objectively.  Next he explains what most of us know, but fail to admit, “…people are flawed” and easily fooled. Science is valuable because it provides a method to be objective  (for more about our difficulty seeing things accurately see, Innate Gullibility Highlights the Value of Predictability)

Science helps because it gives us a process that minimizes our biases so we can see reality more clearly. I encourage you to listen to his presentation below.

Next, an interesting RadioLab discussion about The Beauty Puzzle (show linked) challenged the evolutionary scientific idea of fitness as the determining factor.  In other words, it suggests we may have made a mistake.  This hypothesis suggests beauty or aesthetics, not survival of the fittest, is the determining factor, and that the ’survival of the fittest’ paradigm was a deliberate perversion of Darwin’s original theory..

 

 

The evidence providedfor this hypothesis,, while it has some merit, for me, provides an unconvincing alternative.  The discussion did not factor in the idea of mental illusions or mistakes in the scientific process as discussed by Phil Plait.  Nor did it take into account mental illusions as outlined by Kahneman and Tversky. (see Undoing Needed because Mental Illusions Impact Us)   As I understand it, evolution is an ongoing big experiment and not all experiments are successful.  Their examples may represent some experiments that may contribute but may not be successful. Possibly, or maybe…

Then I heard Marjan van Aubel‘s TED Presentation about solar energy, The beautiful future of solar power.  She suggest beauty may in fact be the determining factor for OUR survival.  In his presentation she explains the importance of aesthetics or beauty and suggests it as necessity if we are to adopt and use the power of the sun.

All together these interesting presentations seem to recommend for us to progress toward a better tomorrow using study, science, experiments, and mistakes to learn how to contribute to a more beautiful tomorrow.

Please share your thoughts.  I will continue to attempt to push evolution with science by creating more beauty through the generation of comprehensive improvements from the creation of pervasive, reciprocal, selfish, selfless, synergistic interactions so everyone and everything benefits, or by practicing paneugenesis.  I look forward to hearing about the how you help generate all good for everyone and everything.

Be Well’r,
Craig Becker

Be selfish, selfless, & synergistic so everyone and everything benefits!

If you want to contact me:
Email: BeWellr@gmail.com

Creating Abundance Better than Poverty Elimination

Information from a recent (3/7/2019) NYT’s column “How to Think About Taxing and Spending Like a Swede” by Monica Prasad, a professor of sociology at Northwestern, linked and  below, indicates the Concept: Create More Good, Not Just Less Bad promoted here and many other posts on this blog works.  This is the idea of paneugenesis, which is generating comprehensive benefits by creating pervasive reciprocal, selfish, selfless, synergistic interactions so everyone and everything benefits.

As noted, using tax money to make it better for improves society for all.  As she notes, “…Sweden has very low poverty and inequality, and economic mobility is significantly higher than it is in the United States; a poor Swede is much more likely to become middle class than a poor American is.”  Sweden’s program is not a Robin Hood, take from the rich and give to the poor strategy or even a way to use taxes to create programs for the poor. “… Sweden does not target much of its spending specifically to the poor.Tax revenue is spent on universal programs, like health care, which benefit most those who live longest; free college tuition takes from those who do not go to college and gives to those who do. Many aspects of welfare state spending in Sweden — as in other European countries — are linked to income, so that the more you earn, the more you receive in benefits. This is enormously effective, because it gives an incentive to Swedes to work hard and earn more.”

To me this seems like a tax policy that can facilitate progress for all.

As you know, I will work for progress by generating comprehensive improvements by creating pervasive, reciprocal, selfish, selfless, synergistic interactions so everyone and everything benefits, or by practicing paneugenesis.  I look forward to hearing about the progress you help generate.

For more information about this I encourage you to read Monica Prasad’s column below:

 

How to Think About Taxing and Spending Like a Swede

Europe has less inequality and more social mobility because its taxation schemes reach deeper into society and do more for everyone.

By Monica Prasad

Ms. Prasad is a professor of sociology at Northwestern.

George Wylesol

In the recent rush of proposals to tax the rich, Democrats have forgotten — or never really cared to learn — an important lesson: The countries that have been most successful at reducing poverty and inequality have not done it by taxing the wealthy and giving to the poor.

Take Sweden, a country often cited by progressives for its extensive social programs. Sweden has very low poverty and inequality, and economic mobility is significantly higher than it is in the United States; a poor Swede is much more likely to become middle class than a poor American is.

We can learn from Sweden, but the lesson is not what many people think. Rich Swedes do get taxed at high rates, but so does everyone else: The average American worker’s total tax burden is 31.7 percent of earnings, compared with 42.9 percent for the average Swede. The Swedes actually tax corporations less: 19.8 percent, compared with 34.2 percent in the United States in 2017, the last year for which we have comparative data — and yes, that’s after all the loopholes and deductions have been accounted for. The American rate will be lower after the 2017 tax bill, but it’s still unlikely to be as low as Sweden’s.

Estate tax? In the United States the average effective rate is 16.5 percent. In Sweden, it’s zero. Swedish national sales taxes, which fall disproportionately on the middle classes, are much higher than sales taxes in the United States. In France, another country held up as an exemplar by progressives, the economist Thomas Piketty and his collaborators found the overall tax structure was actually a bit regressive, meaning the wealthiest pay slightly lower rates of tax than the less wealthy. Throughout Europe, since World War II, the rule has been high taxes on labor and low taxes on capital.

On the spending side, Sweden does not target much of its spending specifically to the poor.Tax revenue is spent on universal programs, like health care, which benefit most those who live longest; free college tuition takes from those who do not go to college and gives to those who do. Many aspects of welfare state spending in Sweden — as in other European countries — are linked to income, so that the more you earn, the more you receive in benefits. This is enormously effective, because it gives an incentive to Swedes to work hard and earn more.

Poverty and inequality do get reduced, though not by redistribution from rich to poor, but rather by redistribution within classes — as the American sociologist Arthur Stinchcombe once put it, from the healthy to the unhealthy, from the young to the old and from the lucky to the unlucky.

These patterns go back to the early 20th century, when many European countries were trying to figure out how to compete with the rising American economic behemoth and decided that they had to nurture their capitalists to do so.

European welfare states have many origin points and many causes, but they took their modern forms around the Second World War, when in countries like France and Germany there simply wasn’t much capital to tax, because the capital stock had been destroyed by war. Higher taxes on corporations and the wealthy in the United States also have their origins in the early 20th century, when politicians representing Midwestern and Southern farmers ganged up against Northeastern industrialists.

Some scholars have drawn on this history to argue that the United States needs to give up its fixation with progressive taxation and adopt a national sales tax as every other advanced industrial country has done.

But this is too literal an interpretation of the lessons of history. It’s hard to make a case for a big new tax in America on the middle classes and the poor after decades when most of the economic benefits have flowed to the wealthy. European countries adopted their tax policies at times when economic growth was desperately needed and capital needed to be built up. Much has changed since then, and European tax systems could at this point stand a bit of reform in a more progressive direction, as the Yellow Vest protesters in France have been trying to tell us.

In Sweden, tax revenue is spent on universal programs like health care.Jonathan Nackstrand/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images

In Sweden, tax revenue is spent on universal programs like health care.Jonathan Nackstrand/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images

The real lesson to take away from Europe is that progressive social programs are most popular, most effective and most durable when they are carried out in ways that do not damage business prosperity. European social reformers didn’t just reduce poverty and inequality. They created a new reality. When conservatives come into power in European countries, they find they cannot take away the progressive policies.

European reformers managed this by embedding progressive policies in business-oriented arrangements. Low taxes on capital are just one example. We don’t need to enact exactly the same policies now — given how much wealthy Americans have benefited over the last several decades, progressive taxation still has a role to play in the United States — but we do need to learn the larger lesson that the secret of the European welfare states is that they are surprisingly business-friendly.

What would a policy that takes these lessons to heart look like in the United States today? It would look a lot like a business-oriented version of the Green New Deal. The recent proposal by Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and Edward Markey needs a great deal of work, but it is far from a pipe dream — indeed, it’s the only proposal we have that is trying to face difficult truths.

For the plan to reduce carbon emissions, however, it has to get started now, and stay in place a long time, including through the next few conservative backlashes. The only way to do that — the only way to make it the new reality of the American economy, rather than a temporary attempt swept away by conservative populism — is to get business on board. This isn’t just because businesses will otherwise fight it, it’s because the American people will otherwise fight it.

To move from vision to reality, the Green New Deal coalition must include business groups, manufacturers, farmers and unions, and reformers need to genuinely listen to and respond to their concerns. They need to focus on solving problems such as the decline in productivity and work force participation, by using the revenue from a carbon tax to create jobs in energy efficiency and renewable energy, and by using higher taxes on capital gains to fund infrastructure, education, and research and development.

Green reformers also need to explain the enormous business opportunity that this historic shift to a zero carbon economy presents. Get businesses to make investments in renewable energy and energy efficiency, and you make your policies not only more feasible, but also irreversible.

None of this would create a European-style welfare state. But if done right, it would create something even more extraordinary: a new model of capitalism that European progressives themselves would, someday, try to imitate.

Monica Prasad, a professor of sociology and a faculty fellow in the Institute for Policy Research at Northwestern University, is the author, most recently, of “Starving the Beast: Ronald Reagan and the Tax Cut Revolution.”

Be Well’r,
Craig Becker

Be selfish, selfless, & synergistic so everyone and everything benefits!

If you want to contact me:
Email: BeWellr@gmail.com

Failure Doesn’t Exist…

Often during interviews, the interviewee will be asked about past failures.  I also got the question about weaknesses and or failures.  My perspective caused me to have trouble understanding this question.  My response was that I have many “failures” but I have always chosen to look at those occasions where I supposedly “failed” as opportunities and or steps toward my goals rather than “failures”.

 

Difficult occasions were frustrating, however I never saw them as problems but rather as necessary steps that offered indications and data that informed me that I needed to find a better way. From my perspective failures didn’t exist, these were the trials and tribulations of the never ending process that seeks to continually improve so we experience achieve progress, or wellness (see Experiencing Wellness = Progress Toward Desired).

I now have learned that this perspective on failure has been and is used by many people that achieve progress.  Some even suggest it is a necessary precursor to success.  It was suggested that this perspective was necessary because it enabled people to continue to move forward and not let themselves feel they were complete failures. It is a perspective that allows people to keep some self-worth. Steve Jobs suggests passion is what helps people persevere beyond when a “sane” person would quit.

Angela Duckworth’s work describes this persevering trait as GRIT.

I am guessing this perspective and GRIT came to me during my recovery from my near fatal car accident.  It was during recovery where I developed what Angela Duckworth calls GRIT and it was what helped me develop perseverance.

Dr. Duckworth discusses GRIT in her powerful 6 minute TED Talk and in her book, GRIT: The Power of Passion and Perseverance.  She notes in her book that Pete Carrol, the successful coach of the Seattle Seahawks, was upset by her presentation because he thought she suggested it was not possible to build GRIT and he thought he was helping players build GRIT.  For more about Pete Carroll’s work with GRIT see “Pete Carroll joins Dr. Angela Duckworth for discussion of grit, coaching philosophy” and “Renowned psychologist impressed with Seahawks’ ‘culture of grit’“.

Without question it is important and valuable to build GRIT to be successful. After all success never happens overnight or without follow through after multiple failures.  As noted in many stories of success, progress requires a Growth rather than a Fixed Mindset as established in Carol Dweck’s work.  Researchers of success emphasizes the need for a Growth rather than a Fixed Mindset in the pursuit of progress. For more about Carol Dweck’s work you can see her TED Talk: The Power of Believing  That You Can Improve and or a discussion at this post:Concept: Create More Good, Not Just Less Bad.

With regard to failures, I just listened to the wonderful Freakonomics podcast that I found to be both educational and inspirational: How to Fail Like a Pro.  Their podcast captures many of these ideals – I encourage you to listen.

I look forward to hearing about your successes so we can all enjoy progress. I will work for progress by generating comprehensive improvements by creating pervasive, reciprocal, selfish, selfless, synergistic interactions so everyone and everything benefits, or by practicing paneugenesis.  I look forward to hearing about the progress you help generate.

Be Well’r,
Craig Becker

Be selfish, selfless, & synergistic so everyone and everything benefits!

If you want to contact me:
Email: BeWellr@gmail.com

 

Make 2019 Great! For Everyone & Everything!

We are all in this together.  As you begin 2019, I encourage you to take Selfish, Selfless, Synergistic actions that result in pervasive, reciprocal interactions from which everyone and everything benefits.  As Frank Borman quoted when he saw our blue planet:

To see the Earth as it truly is, small and blue and beautiful in that eternal silence where it floats, is to see ourselves as riders on the Earth together, brothers on that bright loveliness in the eternal cold — brothers who know now that they are truly brothers. – Archibald MacLeish

Keep in mind, when you are helping others you are helping yourself and this ripples out for and to everyone and everything.  As Charles Schulz showed us in Peanuts:

 

 

 

 

 

Make it a beneficial ripple. Choose to be the hero:

   A way to make 2019 better, will be to join “Team Human” as media theorist Douglas Rushkoff discusses in his TED Talk, ” How to be ‘Team Human’ in the Digital Future.  Enjoy.

 

Please share your thoughts on how you will take action to help create a better tomorrow. Lets make  2019 Great, I will do what I can!  Let me know if how I can help you…

Be Well’r,
Craig Becker

Be selfish, selfless, & synergistic so everyone and everything benefits!

Contact me at:
Email: BeWellr@gmail.com

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