A Great Way to Improve While in Self-Quarantine

Tony Robbins sent this message about dealing with this difficult time. “…We will spring back to normal life, like we always do, like we’ve done for centuries. And when we do, will you be prepared? Are you trained for future challenges? I always say: The meeting of preparation and opportunity generates the offspring we call luck.” This post provides you with a great opportunity to help you be more prepared.

In all my posts, I end by asking the reader to share how they “… generate comprehensive improvements by creating pervasive, reciprocal, selfish, selfless, synergistic interactions so everyone and everything benefits”. You can LEARN HOW  to do this by actively learning from Dr. Henry Neave’s FREE interactive  “12 Days to Deming” course.

Dr. Henry Neave worked with Dr. W. Edwards Deming, the quality management expert, that changed the world and my life. Henry also wrote a great book, “The Deming Dimension“.

Henry has now created a Virtual Way for you to experience the famous, life altering, Deming 4-Day Seminar with his FREE Course, “12 Days to Deming“. This is a great activity to engage with during our shared time in self-quarantine. You can FREELY access and learn from this powerful, educational interactive learning course at 2 sites: (1) the UIC site at www.theuic.com/deming/ and (2) the SPC Press site at www.spcpress.com/12-Days-To-Deming.php .

The “12 Days to Deming course helps the learner understand how begin to apply this breakthrough approach. The “12 Days to Deming program provides newcomers with a great introduction to a better style of manage­ment. It has also been able to fill in gaps in the understanding of well-seasoned Deming prac­ti­tioners.

Henry had the rare pleasure of working directly with Dr. Deming during the final and most pro­ductive few years of Deming’s fortunately long life. He says that he has laid out his course in the form of 12 days of study and activity because it took him personally three of Dr. Deming’s four-day seminars for the latter’s wisdom to begin to sink in!  

The “12 Days to Deming files (ordered by their initial alphabetic identifiers A­–S) are exactly the same on the two websites and are immediately downloadable from both.  The downloading takes only a few seconds at most.  Once downloaded, each file can then be viewed on-screen and/or printed out, irrespective of which of the two websites you are using. 

I encourage you to access these sites to get the course and learn the profound knowledge of Dr. Deming. It will change your life for the better. It is not another way to understand what you already know. After actively participating and learning his teaching you will be transformed because you will experience a very positive dramatic change. I encourage you to start right away, if you do, this quarantine time will help you become the positively productive person you want to be!

I encourage you to use this quarantine time to learn Deming’s teachings by accessing and actively engaging with Dr. Neave’s course, “12 Days to Deming. If you are interested, I share some information below about some ways learning Dr. Deming’s quality methods impacted me, my life and my career.

My life was changed, dramatically, when I was a junior in college (1988).  In my organizational behavior class at Purdue l learned about the quality management methods espoused by W. Edwards Deming for an assignment. I learned a lot about it from my dad who was implementing these methods at his Bethlehem Steel Mill. He shared some materials that I read and it inspired me to learn more.

After reading the only book out at that time, “Quality, Productivity, and Competitive Position“, the methods he discussed were so obvious, my thought was, “How could any other methods be used?” Later I also read his other books, “The New Economics for Industry, Government, Education” and “Out of the Crisis“. The New Economics is a great quick read.

After learning his methods and getting my degree, I entered my career in the working world. I was shocked when I learned that despite the proven success of these methods by the Japanese in the 1980’s and many others, most in America were still not using these methods. The dysfunctional, confrontational “prevailing style of management” was and, even today, is still being used. Many attempted to partially adopt his methods after the TV show NBC White Paper, “If Japan Can, Why Can’t We?“, but partial adoption was insufficient. A transformation was needed. Those that did the transformation, such as Ford in the late ’80’s, had remarkable success.

Although I did not realize it at the time, Dr. Deming’s teachings changed my life. Everything I have done since learning Dr. Deming’s methods attempts to implement his methods. For example, I am applying quality management methods to health and my Paneugenesis concept, of selfish, selfless, synergy that generates comprehensive improvements by creating interactions so everyone and everything benefits is my way of operationalizing Demings Methods.

I had actually forgotten the dramatic impact Deming had on my work until I attended a Deming Conference at Purdue in 2008. At that conference I realized all my work was my attempt to implement the teachings of Dr. Deming so I could have a positive impact on the world by promoting positive health just as Deming promoted quality.

To continue my learning, I read books about Deming written by his colleagues. I also attend and present at Deming Conferences ongoing around the world. In addition to my reading, I regularly listen to Deming PodCasts available through the Deming Institute and also access their resources. In addition to actively engaging in Dr. Neave’s 12 Days to Deming“, if you are interested in learning more, I encourage you to do the same.

In my work I emphasize that we must “Do More Good, Not Just Less Bad“. This was one of my main takeaways from his teachings. As most of us now know, just fixing problems is insufficient, we must revitalize and restore to create a better, sustainable future.

The sustainability concept doesn’t mean keeping things as they are because that is not enough, we must do better. I attempted to describe this idea in the “Create More Good Not Just Less Bad” presentation I did for the sustainability committee at my university. I also address this concept in many other posts on this site.

Dr. Deming’s impact on our world was powerful and there are now many opportunities to learn about Deming’s methods. Without a doubt, one of the best ways to learn about this life changing information is by actively engaging with Dr. Neave’s 12 Days to Deming“. The effort you put in learning Deming will have a profound positive impact on your life. The Deming Institute also offers multiple resources that I encourage you to investigate.

I am promoting this course because engaging with Dr. Neave’s 12 Days to Demingis a great way to practice paneugenesis so you will be able to generate comprehensive improvements by creating of pervasive, reciprocal, selfish, selfless, synergistic interactions so everyone and everything benefits. After you learn from this course, please share your insights below and encourage everyone you know to engage with this course so you can help add a surge to the positive ripple Dr. Deming started. Thank you.

Be Well’r,
Craig Becker

Be selfish, selfless, & synergistic so everyone and everything benefits!

Please share your thoughts below. If you have questions or ideas to share, please contact me:
Email: BeWellr@gmail.com

McKibben Shares What We can Learn from Covid-19

**BONUS POST FOR THE WEEKEND**

Bill McKibben, American environmentalist, author, and journalist who has written extensively on the impact of global warming shares some thoughts in his New Yorker column:

Bill McKibben, like all of us, knows the corona virus is a scourge on society. Despite this, he sees an opportunity in this problem. The opportunity will be something we can cause to happen. The opportunity is that when we are able to move beyond forced isolation, we need to remember how valuable social connections are for a better life. As we understand that, we should then work toward designing our life to incorporate more beneficial interactions with family, friends and colleagues. He also explains that this crisis can help us remember how wonderful it is to be able to telecommute, if needed, and to buy local.

My reading of his article suggests that this terrible crisis may help us remember and then move toward a better and more productive way of living that also results in a higher quality of life and greater satisfaction, if we chose. He also seems to be suggesting that by creating pervasive, reciprocal, selfish, selfless interactions – everyone and everything benefits because these interactions generate comprehensive improvements. In other words, he suggests we should Practice Paneugenesis. Please share how you generate comprehensive improvements!

Please share your thoughts below. Thank you.

Be Well’r,
Craig Becker

Be selfish, selfless, & synergistic so everyone and everything benefits!

Thank you for reading, please comment below and contact me:
Email: BeWellr@gmail.com

Make 2020 Your Best Decade Yet…

This post provides my wishes for a Happy New Year and ideas to make this a great Decade for everyone and everything!  Like most of humanity, I desire a better tomorrow. While our specific visions may differ, at core we want a world with more Love, Well-Being, Capacity and Potential. Scientific evidence has demonstrated that this type of future is not only possible, it is already on-going. Most things have gotten better in many ways.

We often miss the improvement because progress erases its tracks. Instead of complimenting our progress, society looks forward toward where we want to go next and forgets to take pride in the progress that has been made. Knowing our tendency to look past achievements, it is helpful to remember to Plot Progress so we can feel good about what has been accomplished.

On December 28, 2019, Nicholas Kristof‘s NYT’s column proclaimed, “This Has Been the Best Year Ever For humanity over all, life just keeps getting better” and “…In the long arc of human history, 2019 has been the best year ever.” Another good summary of our improvements was made by Steven Pinker in Enlightenment Now: The Case for Reason, Science, Humanism, and Progress. I described this at Things are Great – And They are Getting Better… and also explained the importance of noticing and documenting our progress at Record Progress To Feel Good or Evidence Disappears. See more in Steven Pinkers Washington Post Interview: “A Harvard professor explains why the world is actually becoming a much better place“. Overall Steve Pinker describes how and why we have,

More Abundance, less poverty; More Peace, less wars; 

More Health, less sickness; More Sustenance, less hunger; 

More Productivity, less barrenness; More Freedom, less tyranny;

More equal rights, less bigotry & discrimination; 

More intelligence, less dull wittedness;More literacy, less illiteracy

More knowledge , less ignorance; More happiness, less misery, meaning…

Overall: We have More opportunities to enjoy family, friends and nature,

less drudgery and monotony

Of course bad things are also happening. Unfortunately, only stopping the bad things cannot make it better, science has provided a preponderance of evidence and examples that documents we must Create More Good, Not Just Less Bad.

Creating Habits

As we all know, if we want to make this a great new year and our best decade ever, we will need to take action. Our actions often turn into habits. This can be good because it frees our brain to do more, however it can also cause unthinking actions and we just do what always did. Understanding this suggests we should remember what Charles Kettering said,

We continually form habits, often without trying. To create the future we want, we should consciously create habits to our liking. Norman Doidge uses an analogy about sledding on a hill with soft snow to describe behaviors and habits.

As we have all experienced, after taking a few trips down a hill with soft snow, the repeated route becomes cleared and easiest to use. In time the path becomes somewhat hardened. Because it is a formed path, it becomes the path that is most likely used again. That path, like things we do in life can become a habit. The other areas of soft snow, like other options available to us in life, are still available. Taking those unused or lightly used paths will force us to develop new behaviors and learn new things.

Choosing to take a new path will likely take more effort because it is a different, unknown route. Although it takes more effort, if we are thinking as we take the new route and believe it is the best course of action, it can be worth the effort. Not only will we be engaged in an exciting and novel activity, we will be learning because we will have to expand our capacity and skills to design this new path. As noted by Robert Frost in “The Road Not Taken”, …taking the road less traveled has made all the difference.

Brain Plasticity

Norman Doidge‘s analogy about habits was in his book “The Brain that Changes Itself: Stories of Personal Triumph from the Frontiers of Brain Science“. A short synopsis of this good book is provided in the video below.

Doidge’s powerful book made clear, through multiple examples, that we are able to continually improve our capacity and abilities because of our innate Brain Plasticity or Neuroplasticity. Brain plasticity is the ability of the brain to form and reorganize synaptic connections. It is the ability of the brain to change continuously throughout an individual’s life in response to thoughts and actions.

Doidge drives home the message, outlined by others, such as Gladwell in Outliers, Clear in Atomic Habits and many others that mass, dedicated practice can help us become and be who we want to be. The book also drove home the point that everything is connected. Over and over it was emphasized that as one thing changes in the brain, the whole brain reorganizes. Thus as anything changes, everything changes. As Deming also explained, everything becomes reorganized because if it did not, the parts could not work together. It is a great book that I recommend. Enjoy.

Now back to the brain. Along with Doidge’s book, “Soft-Wired: How the Science of Brain Plasticity Can Change Your Life” by Dr. Michael Merzenich was very powerful. It probably impacted me more because my dad recently passed away and had suffered from dementia and Alzheimers. Dementia is brain plasticity in the wrong direction. It is a horrible disease.

Soft-Wired was consistent with Doidge. That is, although plastic brain changes happen automatically when we are young when our brain is developing and forming, the brain still changes throughout our life. From cradle to grave. The less rapid adult changes that happen in adulthood, unlike what happens in childhood, is that to a greater extent we can direct how our brain changes and thus create the brain we want. Multiple examples and my own recovery from a car accident where I suffered a severe brain contusion, makes clear, despite difficulties, the brain can reorganize and improve with directed effort.

Make 2020 a Great Start

Understanding this means we should use the “fresh snow” in 2020 to design our actions into habits we want. We should do this because evidence suggests doing so can help us generate the outcomes we desire. To start the decade right we should dream and focus on what we want to happen. Not just for ourselves but for society so we can live in a place that nurtures, encourages, supports and promotes chronic wellness. We defined chronic wellness as a persistent positive conditions enabled through engagement in health-causing actions.

The long term dream should be exciting, motivating and inspiring, so the desired outcome is more than just not bad. Of course we also need multiple short aims to document progress. For all these desires, they must be something that requires the development new abilities, connections and skills to make it so.

It also must be understood, actions should be about more than simply turning a negative into a positive. It needs to be more because it is impossible to practice paneugenesis if you start from a negative. Like salutogenesis, a health creating method or the study of the origins of health and a method to practice paneugenesis in health, you must start with the positive to create, not a negative to eliminate. To understand more, this idea is explained in the video that provides a comparison of Salutogenesis & Pathogenesis.

Eliminating a negative is like putting out a fire.

We cannot turn a negative into a positive. The best we can do is learn from a bad event and make things better in the future. For example, my Dad passed away last year and he had Alzheimers. It is a terrible disease because it turned him into a person we could not even recognize and everyone suffered. After seeing the terrible event, I have learned a lot more about brain disease and brain potential (see links and video’s by Merzenich and Doidge below). This does not make his death a positive, it will always be sad. I am however using that event to inspire me to learn more so I can design a better future for everyone and everything. This future will also make Alzheimers less likely as a by-product.

Being More Effective

Related to this and what has been frustrating to me is what seems to be a perception that there needs to be a problem before action is started. This is the same as attempting to turn a negative into a positive.  Fixing a problem is not necessary for improvement. Actually, if improvement is desired Prevention Can’t Work and Problems are Irrelevant! because Fixing Problems is Inefficient, Ineffective & Insufficient. Each link explains more about these ideas.

From that perspective, to illustrate this point, we all know the story “The Boy Who Cried Wolf”.

We learned from this fable that he was ignored because he said there was a wolf when one was not there killing his sheep. He did this because he was bored. Then when a wolf did show up and he called for help, nobody came to help. The moral of the story, “Nobody believes a liar” or “the habit of lying is dangerous”.

The story can relate to prevention because if prevention works, nothing happens. Yea! Thus the benefit is less bad, not more good.  If however we focus on creating more good, we can experience benefits which make it more likely we will take action and as a by-product, of generating more good, we will also be better able to avoid and prevent problems. Additionally, if problems happen, which they will, more good will enable a faster or more capable recovery.

For these reasons and many more, to make 2020 our best decade yet, a focus on creating more good, not just less bad is our best option. To understand more about this you can see this presentation I made to a sustainability committee, “Create More Good, Not Just Less Bad“.

Our Shared Desire for Improvement

Our shared desire is for improvement. Besides, attempting to turn a negative into a positive requires us to look back at how to fix something rather than how to create something better. No matter what we do in the future the negative still happened. In other words, as noted, putting out a fire keeps us at 0, or our status quo. If we want better, we must create better, or what I call +3.

Our shared goal should be to create a better future for everyone and everything that also makes it less likely for the negative event to happen – as a by-product. For this to happen, we need to take action so we can build on the wonderful progress we have made.  To continue progress we must go on offense to make it happen. I described how it can work for health promotion at Article: Going on Offense to Enable Health Gains Published.

A way to generate a desired future can be accomplished by using the first step of practicing paneugenesis. The first step is to dream about the future you want and create an Idealized Outcome. The Idealized Outcome must be something that could not happen otherwise, it has to be something we must cause to happen and it must be better than what would happen even if everything went well, the status quo. In other words, practicing paneugenesis can help you contribute to making 2020 the best decade for you and everyone and everything.

Practice Paneugenesis using this 4 Step to Process

  1. Operationalize Desired Idealized Outcome
    • Determine an Idealized outcome that is better or improved from what is possible or able to happen now
    • Must incorporate Systems Thinking so the outcome benefits are on multiple levels without any seen harm to other levels
  2. Discover and Develop Necessary Precursors to make Desired Outcome Possible
    • Research to discover what must come before idealized outcome, what must be true for desired outcome to occur
    • Assess current process to discover and learn current processes used or must be created to manifest ideal outcomes
    • These Precursors are goals that must be achieve before an Idealized Outcome can be realized.
  3. Optimize the Process to Develop Skills and abilities that make Precursors possible (this is Green Grass philosophy, its designing a process to help grass grow)
    • Develop good practices (append existing or start new processes)
    • Update unneeded, outdated or inappropriate actions to ones that created idealized vision,
    • Focus on what causes more and more blades of grass to grow, and…
  4. Plot Progress to document, demonstrate, and celebrate Improvement
    • Measure and document progress forward toward idealized outcome
    • Plan and develop next steps to enable continual improvement

This video explains the concept of Paneugenesis.

 

Please share your progress and what you do to help make 2020 our Best Decade Yet.

If you are interested, below are some good presentations about Brain Plasticity.

This video is an interview with Norman Doidge about brain plasticity.

 

In this presentation Dr. Merzenich outlines some of his findings to help us generate the brain we want.

These are more videos that evolved from Norman Doidge’s book, “The Brain that Changes Itself”.

I look forward to working with all of you to make 2020 the best decade yet for everyone and everything by generating comprehensive improvements through the creation of pervasive, reciprocal, selfish, selfless, synergistic interactions so everyone and everything benefits, or by practicing paneugenesis.

Be Well’r,
Craig Becker

Be selfish, selfless, & synergistic so everyone and everything benefits!

Please share your thoughts below.                                                                                                                                If you have questions or ideas to share, please contact me:
Email: BeWellr@gmail.com

True cost is all about The External Ripple

When something is bought, we think the true cost is what we paid in that transaction. The true cost of anything however is much more than the transactional cost. I discuss this in the recent post: It is All about the Ripple…

I was reminded about the “True Cost” when I attended the sustainability movie shown at our school “The True Cost” (trailer below). This movie was about the ripple effects on so many by what is called “fast fashion”. Something I had not previously realized.

The low cost of our clothes encourages people to buy more clothes, ie. Fast Fashion. Unfortunately, those costs that we don’t pay are born by disadvantaged populations and our environment, something upon which we all depend which means we all pay the True Costs.

Currently our accounting methods do not account for the True of full cost – especially from nature. The current capitalism accounting methods favor supply side economics and market prices and these methods to not reflect the full costs or values. Resulting market inefficiencies mean Adam Smith’s “invisible hand” cannot make proper adjustments that would be made if all costs were being counted. 

Capitalism values lower prices and this encourages producers to shift costs to society, the public and the environment. True or total cost of ownership, or ecological economics, includes all direct and indirect costs and its impact on the system. Costs unknowingly born by society, rather than the producers, are termed externalities. For instance, polluted air or water caused by local industry is an externality or cost born by the public at large rather than the pollution-producing entity.

Externalizing costs impacts business decisions because, unless stipulated by law, these costs are not recorded. As an illustration, consider the industry-ignored externalities from single-use plastic bags used yearly in the US. The externalities were equivalent to burning 439 million gallons of oil, leaches of toxins into the soil and water, and harm to wildlife cost an estimated $4 billion.  Noting these impacts has led many to ban the use of single- use plastic bags. The invisibility of externalities also negatively affects benefits because they are hidden by current accounting methods.

While most see this issue as unavoidable, Interface International offensively designed a plan to change from a destructive to a restorative company. They created a collaborative, sustainable business strategy that expanded its business, increased its profits, helped employee morale, increased profits, and improved the environment. Interface was an example of how selfish, selfless, synergistic processes designed to benefit the customer, the company and the environment, generates improved outcomes.

Ray Anderson was the founder andvisionary leader of Interface Carpets who rebuilt that company from one that was ecologically destructive to one that is becoming restorative. You can see his inspiring TED Talk below.

Image result for anderson one day people like me will go to jail

His drive  also helped the climate crisis by developing and using regenerative practices. They put in place a better way so everyone and everything benefitted.
“The True Cost” movie is a reminder, however, in my view it falls short because it doesn’t tell us how to invest so we have a more prosperous tomorrow like Ray Anderson did for Interface Global. Ray Anderson practiced paneugenesis because he was able to generate all good by creating pervasive, reciprocal, selfish, selfless, synergistic interactions so everyone and everything benefits. This is how we can make today better while also investing for a better tomorrow. It is all about the ripple. Please share your thoughts and any other examples about how you are creating a positive ripple and a positive externality.
Be Well’r,
Craig Becker

Be selfish, selfless, & synergistic so everyone and everything benefits!

If you want to contact me:
Email: BeWellr@gmail.com

Living, Thriving, & Healing…Can it be simple?

Life is really simple, but we insist on making it complicated. – Confucius

My career has been focused on working to do what can cause desired outcomes.  Is that the same thing as healing? As an athlete I worked hard to improve my performance.  As a student I studied hard to learn the material and to become educated.  As a professor and research I investigate to discover if doing good, causes good.  As it turns out, it does.  This may seem obvious and straightforward, however many times we do the opposite.  In business we seek to cut costs to improve service – how is that possible?  Quality management demonstrated if we focus on improving quality, a positive chain reaction results from which everyone and everything can benefit.

As noted in August 21, 2019 Post, Top CEO’s Refocus on More than Profits…Hurray!, many are realizing we must seek to profit the system, not just an organization. This was what Deming consistently emphasized and is why those using his quality management methods have been successful. One of Deming’s messages in Profound Knowledge is: Appreciation for a System . This emphasizes that we are an interactive system, rather than a set of discrete and independent departments or processes governed by independent circumstances. When all the connections and interactions are working together, tremendous benefits for everyone and everything can be achieved.

Elisabeth Rosenthal’s book, “American Sickness: How Healthcare Became Big Business and How You Can Take It Back” everyone should read. It outlines the opposite of working as a system. Here is a NYT review. It provides an example of how we have made things complicated. What has happened in healthcare has also been cited as what also caused the recent financial crisis. In these situations, rather than work as a system, multiple independent groups attempted to maximize their benefits and profits instead of promoting the system so all could benefit. The result, we all lose.

Her book is eye opening, obvious, evident, disturbing and problematic.  How did this happen when so many are doing what they think is best.  It is an example of what both Deming and Ackoff meant when they said doing the best work is not helpful if you are doing the wrong things.

This story is also outlined in this movie, “Healing Cancer from the Inside Out”. It is available on Amazon and below on YouTube when posted. First is the trailer, then the movie.

Please keep in mind:

Life is really simple, but we insist on making it complicated. – Confucius

Rather than work independently, I recommend the practice of paneugenesis. This practice works to generate comprehensive improvements to creating pervasive, reciprocal, selfish, selfless, synergistic interactions so everyone and everything benefits. There is no downside to doing this. Why would we do anything else?

Make it a Great Day, Week, Year and Life!

Be Well’r,
Craig Becker

Be selfish, selfless, & synergistic so everyone and everything benefits!

Email me if you want to discuss: 
Email: BeWellr@gmail.com

Top CEO’s Refocus on More than Profits…Hurray!

According to recent news, it was indicated that Practicing Paneugenesis becomes the Corporate Way – Now and Again. To practice paneugenesis means to generate comprehensive improvements by creating interactions so everyone and everything benefits. In corporate speak it means benefitting all stakeholders, not just shareholders.

The August 21, 2019 Daily broadcast What American C.E.O.s Are Worried About by Andrew Ross Sorkin, a financial columnist for The New York Times, reported that “…almost 200 chief executives, including the leaders of Apple, Pepsi and Walmart, argued that companies must invest in employees, protect the environment and deliver value to customers.” The declaration that “Shareholder Value Is No Longer Everything, Top C.E.O.s Say“, aligns with practicing paneugenesis. I encourage  you to listen to this inspirational show!

This show reported that 100 years ago businesses did do what was best for customers, employees and communities until Milton Friedman influenced their actions. This August 21, 2019 Daily Show, reported that these nearly 200 executives tried this week to redefine the role of a corporation in society. They indicated a corporations new philosophy would be more aligned with Practicing Paneugenesis. They also reported they were doing this, not out of altruism or because it was the right thing to do, but because it is the politically needed way to act and because it was the best way to do business now.

In other words acting in ways that align with paneugenesis would be more profitable. Of course this aligns with what Aaron Antonovsky implied in his 1996 article,”The salutogenic model as a theory to guide health promotion” when he commented on page 12, “…No on contends that museums payoff in cash.” By this, he suggested that museums are not strictly profitable but are profitable to society because they help create a better society for everyone and everything.

The August 21st’s NYT’s Daily show reported that the change such that business became more focused on profit was influenced by Milton Friedman’s view that profits were above all else. His work suggested that higher profits were the best thing corporations could do for society. They also suggested Friedman’s work influenced the 1980’s greed focus that generated multiple corporate raiders who cut costs to boost profits. These changes did lead to higher profits but they also led to layoffs, lower charitable contributions and decreased pensions plans to benefit the associated stock. As was seen, the actions that led to higher corporate stock prices led to a decreased quality of life in society.

The report also indicated that the philosophy change toward a more expansive view of stakeholders began to change with financial crisis 10 years ago and the major shift of benefits toward the 1% at the expense of the rest of us. They also reported that these changes are what helped fuel the rise of political activists and now presidential candidates Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren.

Once again this reflects the needed shift from a short to a long-term, or from an acute toward chronic dedication. Although they indicate the change is happening because our times indicate it is now right thing to do and more profitable, research suggest it is always more profitable if we use a a longer lens.This is how it was and how it should be because it is the most beneficial way to generate a richer society for everyone and everything.
In more news about this change, Tom Wilson, Chief Executive of All State suggested in his August 21, 2019 New York Times column that we pay people more. His article, “Save Capitalism by Paying People More” because changing the role of shareholders was only a start. He therefore emphasizes that Boards and C.E.O.s must create more higher-paying jobs.  However, in my view this perspective is too limited. It cannot just be about creating jobs for today but about creating a sustainable better future tomorrow.  This means we won’t know exactly the job to be done, but we to create more good and not just less bad the focus has to be on generating comprehensive improvements by creating interactions so everyone and everything benefits.

Please share your thoughts. I look forward to hearing about the how you catch the wave and practice paneugenesis so you will generate all good by creating pervasive, reciprocal, selfish, selfless, synergistic interactions so everyone and everything benefits. Overall this focus on how to improve, not just prevent decline is selfish, selfless and synergistic.  Please share how you generate more good, not just less bad.

For me this is about how we can Exceed expectations as I share in this video:

PS- sorry I have not posted for a couple of months. I have been busy collecting dots and plan to share the many things I have been learning…

 

Be Well’r,
Craig Becker

Be selfish, selfless, & synergistic so everyone and everything benefits!

Email me if you want to discuss: 
Email: BeWellr@gmail.com

 

 

Use Prospective Hindsight to Create a Better Tomorrow

I define Prospective Hindsight as looking back from an idealized outcome or a desired future. As we all know, hindsight is 20/20.  Using hindsight from a desired future has been shown to be a great way to see how that future can be created. Often it is used to find problems, but it also can be used to design a helpful path to a desired future.  Of course the first step is imagining and making clear the desired future.  This is the first step, Operationalize or develop an understandable vision fo the future that is desirable.

New Research Supports Using Prospective Hindsight

UConn Today wrote about the New research that suggests “The Power of Empathy in Product Development” is helpful. The research to be published, “Head vs. Heart: the Effect of Objective versus Feelings-Based Mental Imagery on New Product Creativity,” will appear in the June 2019 issue of the Journal of Consumer Research. Marketing professors Kelly Herd (University of Connecticut) and Ravi Mehta (University of Illinois) found that creativity was improved if they took a few minutes before beginning to envision, or think about how the customer would feel eating the snack.  In other words, they used Prospective Hindsight to Operationalize and Idealized Outcome and it helped.

Paul Hawken also used Prospective Hindsight in his new book that he edited, “Drawdown: The Most Comprehensive Plan Ever Proposed to Reverse Global Warming“. In the book he explains how we must work toward a society that heals rather than steals the future in the great book he edited. The book outlines multiple interdependent and interconnected ways to work together to start creating a better tomorrow today. In other words, this book helps people see what a better future could look like and what we can start doing to make that new future a reality.

Most importantly, Paul Hawken ends by explaining this isn’t just a good way to do things, they are the best alternative. These suggestions are a better way because using these methods will generate higher monetary gains than are possible with the traditional, “business as usual”, methods that we know are causing problems.

The book resonated with me because all of my work is focused on how to picture and then create a better tomorrow.  As a professor I aim in my publications, presentations and classes to give people tools to design and create an idealized tomorrow. My desire is not to only be able to do what has been done, but to do better.  Better, from my view, means the new ways will benefit everyone and everything through the generation of comprehensive improvements by creating pervasive, reciprocal, selfish, selfless, synergistic interactions so everyone and everything benefits.  I define these actions as practicing paneugenesis or creating all good.

To demonstrate I am not just dreaming of something that could be, this post shares others making their vision a reality.  These examples are ones that have developed a clear picture of a desired tomorrow (their Operationalize and Idealized Outcome).  These examples also have a description or examples of what must exist for their vision to happen (Precursors).  These examples also have an outline about what needs to happen starting (Optimize the Process) to make it happen.  These examples also explain how they will know they are making progress so they can to Plot Progress to demonstrate the benefits being achieved.

These examples include The International Living Future Institute and their challenges, “The Ray” for improving transportation, and Elon Musk’s vision for clean energy production for everyone’s home.

A Desirable Living Future

The International Living Future Institute is a global network dedicated to creating a healthy future for all.  To make this happen they have the ongoing “Living Building Challenge“, the “Living Product Challenge“, and the “Living Community Challenge“.

The Living Building Challenge is the world’s most rigorous proven performance standard for buildings. People from around the world use a regenerative design framework to create spaces that, like a flower, give more than they take. These types of buildings are being built around the world. See Certified buildings here.

The Living Product Challengeis a framework for manufacturers to create products that are healthy, inspirational and give back to the environment.  This challenge aims to create products that regenerate nature and improve our quality of life.

The Living Community Challenge is a framework for master planning, design, and construction. It is a tool to create a symbiotic relationship between people and all aspects of the built environment. The program is a call to action to governments, campuses, planners, developers and neighborhood groups to create communities that are as connected and beautiful as a forest. You can view community’s actively involved making the vision a reality here.

“The Ray” is an Operationalized an Idealized Outcome for Transportation

Named after Ray Anderson, the world renown innovator from Interface, this item is highway material that would rebuild transportation into a restorative, rather than destructive activity. “The Ray” would create a regenerative highway ecosystem.  Right now they are testing on “The Ray’s” 18-mile stretch of I-85. Several pilot projects are already underway. Click here and or watch the video’s below to see their Technology Showcase to learn about the solar-powered vehicle charging, tire safety check station, solar-paved highways and all their other exciting pursuits.

If you are interested, Ray Anderson was the founder and visionary leader of Interface Carpets who rebuilt that company from ecologically destructive to being restorative.

Image result for anderson one day people like me will go to jail

As noted previously, the late Ray Anderson helped Interface Global make better carpets, increase productivity, profits, and morale, while it also helped not just work to solve the climate crisis but to regenerate a better environment. They put in place a better way for everyone and everything.

Elon Musk’s Vision

Elon Musk’s organizations want to collect solar energy to fuel life.  Extra energy could support the grid.  These video’s show an exciting vision, though I would like to know more about at the current status of these projects. Please share if you can provide an update.

I look forward to hearing about the how you practice paneugenesis like these examples.  To practice paneugenesis means to generate all good by creating pervasive, reciprocal, selfish, selfless, synergistic interactions so everyone and everything benefits. Please share your thoughts and any other examples of where you see this happening. Thank you.

Be Well’r,
Craig Becker

Be selfish, selfless, & synergistic so everyone and everything benefits!

If you want to contact me:
Email: BeWellr@gmail.com

 

Do we need an Independent Referee for Life?

For some time I have been thinking about the importance of perceived fairness.  Evidence suggests fairness is innate because we see it in very young children.  I also believe I have seen the concept of fairness in my dogs.  Is it a law such that even dogs want fairness?

As I had been thinking about it, I learned about Michael Lewis’s new Podcast, Against the Rules. This podcast promotes itself by explaining how it will “…look at what’s happened to fairness.  The podcasts look in financial markets, newsrooms, basketball games, courts of laws and much more.  He asks, what happens to a world where everyone hate the referee?”  I have only listened to a few, however what I have heard have been great!

To me, fairness is a basic necessity or a precursor to being able to do better than what is expected or what have been called best practices. For me fairness is the 0 I emphasize in my exceeding expectations video (below).

Please share your thoughts about how we can build fairness into our daily lives so people don’t feel cheated.  When things aren’t fair, everybody loses something because the cumulative benefits, though tilted toward one party, will still be less for all.  I will continue to work at generating comprehensive improvements beyond just being fair through the creation of pervasive, reciprocal, selfish, selfless, synergistic interactions so everyone and everything benefits, or by practicing paneugenesis.  I look forward to hearing about the how you help generate all good for everyone and everything.

If you want to contact me:
Email: BeWellr@gmail.com

Update: Evidence that Culture Beats Strategy – A Story…

As of May 6, 2019, I learned about a wrinkle to this story.  The wrinkle appeared when I listened to Michael Lewis’s Against The Rules Podcast, “The Alex Kogan Experience”  on Against the Rules with Michael Lewis and it puts into doubt some of the claims.  I encourage you to listen to this podcast to go along with this post.  Enjoy!

Original Post:
Once again, in my continual quest to learn, it seemed all was connected and a story was formed.  In the morning I listened to the NYT’s Daily broadcast: The Whistle-Blowers at Boeing from The Daily in Podcasts. The story made clear, despite quality managers, the culture did not make it possible for them to do their job.

Evidence between culture and strategy relates to short and long-term results.  Strategy’s can work for a short time, but in the end, culture determines what happens. This Daily episode resonated with so many other things I had been reviewing and hearing, it indicated to me there was a story being told.  This is the story I heard being told…

Although I am late reading Jeremy Rifkin’s 2000 book, “Age of Access: The New culture of hyper capitalism where all of life is a paid for experience“, it is currently relevant.  Now, because I have the ability to use hindsight, I am amazed by his prescience or foreknowledge about how technology would impact our world.   He accurately  predicted the changes that have taken place because of the Internet, FaceBook, and our almost constant reliance to our online world.  Throughout the book he talks about how it will, and now has, impacted and changed our culture.

Most importantly, near the end, he explains that culture is the precursor or necessary prerequisite to commerce or a market economy.  He points out that trust and empathy, something developed from face to face contact, is necessary for a caring society.  He was concerned that having only an online relationship could cause harm.

I then heard an example of how the harm he predicted may be attributed to online interactions in Carole Cadwalladr’s TED Talk, Facebook’s role in Brexit — and the threat to democracy. Through this presentation she outlines how an online culture was the instigator for Brexit and Trump.  Of course, all of this was possible because of our innate gullibility and our brain biases or the mental illusions we face as humans.

Then I heard another TED Talk by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie,The danger of a single story.  In her presentation she explained how all these things in very simple terms. She explained how it all relates to when we rely on a single story.  Kahneman and Tversky’s work backs up her presentation when they talked about the representativeness heuristic.  The representative heuristic happens when people ignore base rates or likely outcomes and become biased by a story that seems representative, this therefore becomes The danger of a single story.

People are easily manipulated.  The original research on representativeness heuristic explained how i a situation where there were 100 people, 70 of which were lawyers and 30 engineers.  Despite knowing this, after a description was given of a random member of that group that was representative of a lawyer or an engineer, those initial 70-30 base rate probabilities were ignored if they were asked to pick the likely profession of a member of the group.  Instead of using the 70-30 base rate, the participant instead used the description or story to predict which profession, lawyer or engineer, the random participant held. If no description of a random participant was provided, people correctly used the base rates provided to make their prediction.  In other words, people were manipulated by the story.

If this summary is not clear due to its brevity, I encourage you to watch either or both of the short YouTube video’s below about the representative heuristic.  I also encourage you to read MIchael Lewis’s book, The Undoing Project or the many examples of these studies provided online.  Overall these studies demonstrated an innate mental bias we have related to stories.

 

To finish the story, I read a January 19, 2019 column, More Schools and Fewer Tanks for the Mideast, from my favorite columnist, Thomas Friedman.  In this column he drove home the point of developing and creating a CULTURE for a better tomorrow is the most important and effective way.  The story suggests that we need to take action to help others become all they can so we can live and help develop a better world, instead of destroying what could be.

Below is Friedman’s column:

The U.S. should send more soft power and less hard power to the region.

Tunisians last week celebrated the anniversary of their 2011 revolution.Yassine Gaidi/Anadolu Agency, via Getty Images

Tunisians last week celebrated the anniversary of their 2011 revolution.Yassine Gaidi/Anadolu Agency, via Getty Images

President Trump’s sudden announcement that he’s pulling U.S. troops out of Syria and shrinking their number in Afghanistan has prompted a new debate about American ground forces in the Middle East and whether keeping them there is vital or not. I’m asking myself the same question. To answer that question, though, I need to start with another question:

Why is it that the one Arab Spring country that managed to make a relatively peaceful transition from dictatorship to a constitutional democracy — with full empowerment for its women — is the country we’ve had the least to do with and where we’ve never sent soldiers to fight and die? It’s called Tunisia.

Yes, Tunisia, the only Middle East country to achieve the ends that we so badly desired for Iraq, Syria, Egypt, Libya, Yemen and Afghanistan, did so after having hosted more U.S. Peace Corps workers over the last 50 years than U.S. military advisers and after having received only about $1 billion in U.S. aid (and three loan guarantees) since its 2010-11 democracy revolution.

By comparison, the U.S. is now spending about $45 billion a year in Afghanistan — after 17 years of trying to transform it into a pluralistic democracy. That is an insane contrast. Especially when you consider that Tunisia’s self-propelled democracy is such an important model for the region, but an increasingly frail one.

American service members arriving in Helmand Province, Afghanistan, in 2017.Andrew Renneisen/Getty Images

American service members arriving in Helmand Province, Afghanistan, in 2017.Andrew Renneisen/Getty Images

It’s threatened by labor strikes, the spillover of instability from Libya, a slowing economy that can’t produce enough jobs or income for its educated young people, a 2016 International Monetary Fund loan that restricts the government from hiring, all causing stresses among the key players in its power-sharing deal involving trade unionists, Islamists, old-regime types and new democrats. For now, Tunisia is holding together, but it could sure use one week’s worth of what we spend in Afghanistan.

Why could Tunisia transition to democracy when others couldn’t? It starts with its founding father, Habib Bourguiba, Tunisia’s leader from independence, in 1956, to 1987.

Though he was a president-for-life like other Arab autocrats, Bourguiba was unique in other ways: He kept his army very small and did not waste four decades trying to destroy Israel; he was actually a lonely voice calling for coexistence.

He educated and empowered Tunisian women and allowed relatively strong civil society groups to emerge — trade unions, lawyers’ syndicates, women’s groups, who were vital to toppling Bourguiba’s tyrannical successor and forging a new Constitution with Tunisia’s Islamic movement. Tunisia was also blessed by having little oil, so it had to invest in its people’s education.

Tunisia, in short, had the cultural underpinnings to sustain a democratic revolution. But political and cultural transformations move at different speeds. The U.S. (myself included) wanted to rush the necessary cultural transformation of Afghanistan and Iraq, but as Peter Drucker once noted, “Culture eats strategy for breakfast.” That fact — plus our own incompetence and their corruption — has eaten alive the U.S. democracy efforts in Iraq and Afghanistan.

All of this shapes how I think about Trump’s abrupt order to withdraw from Syria and desire to get out of Afghanistan. I think he is right on Afghanistan. We’ve defeated Al Qaeda there; it’s time for us to negotiate with the Taliban and Pakistan the best phased exit we can — and take as many people who worked for us as we can. Afghanistan has hard countries around it — Russia, Pakistan, India, China and Iran — and they have the ability to contain and manage the disorder there. We gave at the office.

I’d keep our special forces in Syria, though, but not because we’ve yet to defeat ISIS. ISIS is a direct byproduct of the wider regional struggle between Sunnis and Shiites, led by Saudi Arabia and Iran. ISIS arose as an extreme Sunni response to the extreme efforts by Iran and pro-Iranian Shiite militias in Iraq and Syria to ethnically cleanse and strip power from Sunnis in Iraq and Syria. As long as Iran pursues that strategy, there will be an ISIS in some form or other.

That’s why the only peace process that could have a stabilizing effect across the Middle East today is not between Israelis and Palestinians — but between Iran and Saudi Arabia.

What the small, not-all-that-costly U.S. force in Syria does that is most important is prevent the awful there from becoming the truly disastrous in a couple ways. It does so in part by protecting the Kurds and moderate Sunnis from the murderous Syrian government and Turkey. The mainstream Syrian and Iraqi Kurds have been, for the most part, forces for decency and Western values in that corner of the world. One day we might build on their islands of decency; they’re worth preserving.

Our forces also help stabilize northeastern Syria, making it less likely that another huge wave of refugees will emerge from there that could further destabilize Lebanon and Jordan and create nativist backlashes in the European Union like the earlier wave did. To me, the European Union is the other United States of the world, and we and NATO have a vital interest in protecting the E.U. from being fractured over a fight over the influx of Mideast refugees.

Finally, I’d take $2 billion of the $45 billion we’d save from getting out of Afghanistan and invest it regionally in all the cultural changes that made Tunisia unique — across the whole Arab world. I’d give huge aid to the American University in Cairo, the American University in Beirut, the American University of Iraq, Sulaimani, and the American University of Afghanistan.

And I’d massively expand the scholarship program we once ran by which top Arab public school students were eligible for a U.S.-funded scholarship to any U.S.-style liberal arts college in Lebanon or anywhere else in the region.

I’d also massively expand student visas and scholarships — especially for Arab women — for study in America. And I’d offer 5,000 scholarships for Iranians to come to America to get graduate degrees in science, engineering or medicine, with visas available in Dubai. That line would be so long! Nothing would embarrass the Iranian regime more.

And I’d give Tunisia a $1 billion interest-free loan and quadruple the size of the Tunisian American Enterprise Fund that promotes start-ups there.

The other $43 billion I’d spend on new infrastructure in America.

Since 9/11, we’ve relied almost entirely on hard power. Some was needed, some is still needed, but most of it failed. It’s time we tried more soft power. It’s time we focused on giving more Arabs and Iranians access to the ingredients that enabled Tunisia to transform itself by itself into a democracy without a single U.S. war fighter.

Yes, it will take a long time. But there was never a shortcut, and the approach we tried with the Pentagon in the lead has only led to multiple dead ends.

Follow The New York Times Opinion section on Facebook, Twitter (@NYTopinion) and Instagram.

Thomas L. Friedman is the foreign affairs Op-Ed columnist. He joined the paper in 1981, and has won three Pulitzer Prizes. He is the author of seven books, including “From Beirut to Jerusalem,” which won the National Book Award. @tomfriedmanFacebook

 

Please share your thoughts.  I will continue to work at generating comprehensive improvements through the creation of pervasive, reciprocal, selfish, selfless, synergistic interactions so everyone and everything benefits, or by practicing paneugenesis.  I look forward to hearing about the how you help generate all good for everyone and everything.

If you want to contact me:
Email: BeWellr@gmail.com

Best Practices are Contraindicated for Improvement

** Valuable input related to statistical theory was provided Allen Scott for this post

The concept of “Best Practices,” is often the well-intentioned aim of many best efforts (see We are Being Ruined by Best Intentions and Best Efforts).  Upon reflection, for several reasons, “Best practices” is contraindicated for any goal that aims to continually improve.

1.  “Best Practices” is a misnomer.  Best practices means this those practices are the standard adn are what should be done.  If not, it suggests operating procedures are being done incorrectly or have there are problematic processes.  This means implementing “Best Practices” will fix problems and get things back to where they should be.  This also means these efforts do not actually “improve.”  Our goals should be to exceed expectations – see video.

2. “Best Practices” implies an end point, that is, once the best practices are adopted – we are done.  Adopting “Best Practices” cannot lead to the best outcomes, over the longer term, because conditions constantly change and these changing conditions means practices must be continually improved.  It is for this reason, practices should be assessed or monitored using Process Behavior Charts** regularly so efforts can be continually improved.  The idea of “Best Practices” runs counter to the idea of continual improvement.

3. Best practices are always contextual, that is they depend on the circumstances.  What is being understood as best practices were best for where they were developed and used but may not apply to the situation where they are being applied.

4. Even more concerning about “Best Practices” is the idea that supposed best practices are being implemented on top of current practices before the existing processes are assessed and understood.  This means efforts could be considered full scale tampering. How could it be known whether these “Best Practices” were not already being used?  Additionally, this type of tampering is problematic because we are adjusting the processes based on the results instead of first understanding the existing process.  Tampering always results in greater variation and worse results, most notably over the longer term.

Instead, study successful practices that led to desired outcomes. In addition, at the same time, it is important to learn more about current processes to see how to improve existing efforts rather than tamper with those processes.  This can be done by conducting research and empowering those involved by getting them real-time information about relevant processes by having them Flow Chart their processes and showing them how to use process behavior charts.  This information help them understand how to improve their processes as it relates to the overall system.  Improving the system will help not only with the project at hand, it will also help the organization become a national model  because it will help the organization more effectively achieve its mission and as a by-product have higher profitability, improved employee morale, higher customer satisfaction, lower wastes and be more likely to create pervasive, reciprocal, selfish, selfless, synergistic interactions so everyone and everything benefits.

Many points captured here are expressed in this updated version of the video about how to Exceed Expectations.  Enjoy.

5. If needed, here is more information about the theory of variation (statistical theory):

**Walter Shewhart discovered two causes of variation in any process that changes over time:

 • Common causes — causes that are inherent in a system (process or product) over time, affect everyone working in the system and affect all outcomes of the system. 

• Special causes — causes that are not always part of a system (process or product) or do not affect everyone, but arise because of specific circumstances.

If only common causes of variation are present, the system is stable or predictable, it has an identity, and prediction of future performance is possible, with a high degree of belief.  When Special or assignable causes are present, this makes the system unstable and unpredictable.  This means we will not be able to accurately predict future performance of the system.

Shewhart created a tool most recently called the Process Behavior Chart to separate the two sources of variation and guide the action of management. Understanding the source of variation directs action by management. If this theory of variation is not understood, most attempts at improvement (in stable systems) will fail and many will make things worse. W. Edwards Deming called these actions without knowledge “tampering.” Applied, Shewhart theory will help us to realize no amount of care, skill, and hard work  will overcome fundamental flaws in our system. If we keep doing what we are doing, we will keep getting about what we are getting. Feedback from current and especially past successes and failures will also be critical information for systemic change. The problems cannot be understood or evaluated without the aid of statistical theory and the effects of any attempt at improvement cannot be evaluated without statistical methods. 

I look forward to hearing about how you continually improve your processes so you are able to generate comprehensive improvements by creating pervasive, reciprocal, selfish, selfless, synergistic interactions so everyone and everything benefits.

Help make it a Great Week for everyone and everything!

Be Well’r,
Craig Becker

Be selfish, selfless, & synergistic so everyone and everything benefits!

Contact me at:
Email: BeWellr@gmail.com

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Best Practices and Meeting Specifications are Orwellian

Orwellian” is an adjective describing a situation, idea, or societal condition that George Orwell identified as being destructive to the welfare of a free and open society. Orwellian can be deceptive and manipulative use of language.  It is Orwellian when words do not convey meaning but corrupt meaning.  This causes us to alter our perception and create a false reality. (see video)

Most of us know this happens when many politicians speak.  It is however very common in our language. Health Centers are Orwellian because they are not where we go for health, “a state of complete physical, mental, and social well-being”, as defined by the World Health Organization (WHO) but are places to treat sickness. Health  is “…not merely the absence of disease and infirmity.”  There are many more examples. For instance I am reading more about quality management methods and a recent section discussed best practices and another talked about specifications.  These are examples of Orwellian terms.

Best practices and meeting specifications are the same idea in different contexts.  Best practices are generally for a service organization and meeting specifications is for a manufacturing organization. Do these practices produce the best outcome?

If we review the idea, at best, these methods would help the employee and organization achieve what is considered the minimum acceptable, NOT THE BEST.  Despite being called best practices, what would you call practices that are not the best but acceptable?   The idea  of “Best Practice” also halts a search for improvement because if it is the best practice, why search for better ways?

Higher quality or quality management practices as espoused by W. Edwards Deming means lower costs and increased productivity.  This definition is different than the general understanding and is another example of Orwellian talk. High quality is not just meeting specifications or doing what is considered best practices it is instilling continual and never ending improvement through innovation.

Meeting specifications, therefore, is the bare minimum, NOT high quality. 

Innovation is the way to improve.  Innovation, however can only happen after statistical control is achieved through reduced variation.  This means the process will produce a predictable outcome, something not possible without stability.  Innovation comes from improving the process with better methods.

Whether we are discussing products, services, or life, it is all about the process.  Do not let Orwellian speak keep you from taking action that will result in better outcomes.  Our lifestyle is our process. By continually improving our lifestyle process, the product of a better life will take care of itself.  Study, learn, and experiment so you can innovate and improve the process of your life. As you continually improve the process, the result will be a better and better outcome.

For me the way to continually improve my process is to find ways to cause all good by generating comprehensive improvements by creating pervasive, reciprocal, selfish, selfless, synergistic, interactions so everyone and everything benefits or the Practice of Paneuegenesis. I encourage you to engage in the practice so you can “Make it a Great Week!

Be Well’r,
Craig Becker

Be selfish, selfless, & synergistic so everyone and everything benefits!

Contact me at:
Email: BeWellr@gmail.com

 

The World is Moving Forward – The US Is Distracted…

For those of you who follow me, you know NYT Columnist Thomas Friedman is one of my favorite writers.  I learn a lot from him.  In his November  28, 2017 column:, “Forget Trump and Discover the World“,  he demonstrates how other countries are making big strides in creating a better tomorrow by moving forward.  For instance, India is developing its digital 21st century economy and we are missing it.  He points out how India is also building a new renewable energy power grid without any US technology.

Oh, and by the way, for those of you who want to preserve coal jobs, this 800-megawatt solar farm “was built with over 5,000 skilled and semiskilled workers,” said Kolli. “We believe the renewable energy sector will create over one million new generation jobs to meet the 175-gigawatt target set by Prime Minister Modi.”

Greenko builds these plants, he added, “in five months using Chinese panels and European inverter-grid integration technologies made in India.” (Notice the absence of U.S. technology in that loop.) Greenko is also making huge strides in battery technology to store solar energy, so it can be used when the sun is not shining, and the company is now in the midst of building the first grid-connected battery storage system integrated with its solar farms.

For me his points are captured in his last paragraph.

So while we’ve been following Trump’s tweets about bringing back “beautiful coal,” India built a billion-user ID network bigger than Twitter and giant solar power plants that are cheaper than coal.

Isn’t interesting how we are focused on how to recapture the past and the rest of the world has focused developing a better tomorrow.  Creating a better tomorrow has been the focus of all my work.  That better tomorrow is an idealized outcome we must imagine and then create.  For our desired future to be realized, the necessary precursors, such as a clean energy power grid and an organization of digital information technology must be in place.

A way to make this happen is …

Practice Paneugenesis using this 4 Step to Process

  1. Determine Desired Idealized Outcome
  2. Develop Necessary Precursors to make Desired Outcome Possible
  3. Optimize the Process to Develop Skills and abilities that  Precursors possible, and
  4. Plot Progress to document, demonstrate, and celebrate Improvement

The world is moving forward toward a better tomorrow.  It seems our distractions are causing the US to be left behind.

We can move forward and contribute toward creating a better tomorrow.  The first necessary step is to look past what is wrong and imagine what could be, that idealized outcome.  We then must roll up our sleeves and work hard toward creating it.  As I have documented, moving forward to create more positives, effectively eliminates, makes irrelevant and or effectively prevents problems. In this way, even if problems aren’t a problem, we all get to enjoy the better tomorrow developed.

I look forward to hearing about the progress you make in generating comprehensive improvements by practicing pervasive, reciprocal, selfish, selfless, synergistic acts by practicing paneugenesis.  This means you are creating all good so everyone and everything benefits!

Be Well’r,
Craig Becker

Be selfish, selfless, & synergistic so everyone and everything benefits!

If you want to contact me:
Email: BeWellr@gmail.com

Choose Well: Economics is our Values, Not Math

Our choices determine our future.  What we choose shows what want and more importantly demonstrates what we value. In other words, as “For Better or For Worse Comic” comic shows:

Economics is a value system masquerading as mathematics

What we choose to buy tells others what we find most valuable because that is what we chose to use our limited resources to purchase.  This also sends  a message to those that supply that good.  Now it is estimated that 90% of the deforestation has been attributed to illegal logging.  This illegal logging happens because people buy goods made from illegally logged trees.  Lumber Liquidators was a most recent charged company for selling products obtained through illegal logging.

Those choices helped illegal logging exist. Choosing purchases that enrich and nourish the earth benefit ourselves and the planet an and exhibit selfish, selfless synergy because from those interaction everyone and everything benefits.  The forests are the earths lungs and like humans, the earth cannot function well without its lungs, our choices can reflect this value.

While these problems can be solved with better choices, it is hard to make these choices without the necessary information to know we are buying items that are contrary to our values.  Many problems have evolved, according to Dr. Richard Wolfe, because of systematic flaws in capitalism. To learn more about these flaws, I encourage you to listen to his discussion about Marxism 101.  So we are clear, I am not promoting Marxism, however Dr. Wolfe’s interview highlights some fatal flaws in capitalism.   Next weeks post will introduce a possible better economic system, the Collaborative Commons that some suggest is the new evolving economic system.  Enjoy Dr. Wolfe’s interview below. Please share your thoughts…

 

Choose to Be Well’r,
Craig Becker

Conventional not Organic Farmers Should Pay a Premium

To practice paneugenesis means to generate comprehensive improvements by creating pervasive, reciprocal, selfish, selfless, synergistic interactions so everyone and everything benefits.  Incumbent with these efforts means we will also be redesigning reality.  To redesign reality this means we need to build a better system that supports, encourages, nurtures and reinforces improvements.

To build a better system, a system must have multiple interdependent parts that can function as much on their own as possible while also contributing to making the whole system better. That means that each part contributes to the whole system and does not take from, or is a detriment to it.

This past week I attended the first East Carolina University Sustainability Symposium.  It was excellent.  While being inspired by speakers and from discussions with colleagues, we realized a way we could help redesign reality to improve the system and encourage paneugenesis.  A discussion with Anna Martin, Program Coordinator at the Water Resource s Research Institute, led to this post. The symposium and related discussion yielded these ideas to generate improvements…

Currently, organic farmers pay a premium to grow and sell organic food – while conventional farmers pay nothing additional.  This also translates to a higher cost to consumers for organic food.  Thus it is a deterrent from buying or growing organic food. Despite the premium costs associated with organic foods, reports suggest purchases of organic foods are growing dramatically, over 100% per year.

From a systems perspective, organic farmers are a positive contributing interdependent component of the whole system.  Organic farmers improve the system while contributing to it, by providing healthy food to humans, without taking away from the whole system.  Conventional farmers on the other hand are not able to function without getting external inputs in the form of petroleum fertilizers to be able to produce their output.  The fertilizers then hurt the whole system in many ways such as contributing to climate change, leaching carbon, and by hurting other species such as bee’s and in many other ways. (see figure below)

Assessment of organic farming relative to conventional farming in the four major areas of sustainability.

Assessment of organic farming relative to conventional farming in the four major areas of sustainability. Source: Nature Plants 2, Article number: 15221 (2016) doi:10.1038/nplants.2015.22it

Obviously, having contributing organic farmers pay a premium while damaging conventional farmers pay nothing does not make sense.  After thinking about it, we realized a simple change would yield a better system.  Instead of having organic farmers pay to grow their food, have conventional farmers who pollute the land, water and air with petroleum based insecticides and herbicides pay the premium. Currently conventional farmers defer those costs to consumers and citizens who pay for it with damaged water, air, and land which leads to a lower quality of life and additional disease care costs for all.  In addition this situation creates a system that nudges or encourages people to make unwise choices.

Despite a system that gives organic food a disadvantage, consumers are choosing organic foods and science indicates it is better for the people, land, water, and air.  To improve the system, shouldn’t the polluters, so-called conventional farmers, rather than the organic food producers, be the farmers who pay the premium?  Costs to grow organic food are rightly used for inspections and the certification process.  It seems it would make more sense to charge farmers who choose to pollute the food and land to pay for inspections and certifications.  This then means they could avoid that premium by growing food organically instead of growing food by adding ecologically damaging petroleum based herbicides and insecticides.

If  polluters paid a premium, the system would change from encouraging the use of polluting methods to supporting, encouraging, nurturing and reinforcing health promoting practices.  Such a change could have dramatic positive effects on the quality of our personal and planetary health. This change would also make organic, not petroleum laced food, the less expensive and natural, or default choice.

Contact your senators and the USDA to advocate for smart policies like this that support, encourage and reinforce agriculture practices that contribute to healthier personal and planetary health. Thank you.

Be Well’r,
Craig Becker

Be selfish, selfless, & synergistic so everyone and everything benefits!

Advanced Potty Training to Benefit Everyone & Everything

From what I have learned, some of this is happening. I hope this post encourages more action to benefit everyone and everything.

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Molly Winter’s interesting TED Presentation, “The Taboo Secret to Better Health” discusses the “Taboo” subject of Advanced Potty Training. I was fascinated by her explanation about how we could treat our Pee and Poo differently so we benefit everyone and everything. Her plans explain how reusing Pee & Poo by designing  a system to do what McDonough and Braungart describe as  “Cradle to Cradle” so we “Upcycle” waste. This technique provides a way to convert what was waste into a valuable resource for its next use, which is Upcycling. The techniques she describes also cleans the water, land and air and this negates the need for aded chemicals and fossil fuels. In other words, everyone and everything benefits.

In this post I am happy to highlight innovative solutions that demonstrate how to practice paneugenesis. Winters “Advanced Potty Training” generates comprehensive improvements that have pervasive, reciprocal positive impacts by creating selfish, selfless, synergistic interactions so everyone and everything benefits.

I encourage you to learn about these innovations and how you may want to help them get implemented in your area…

Be Well’r,
Craig Becker

Be selfish, selfless, & synergistic so everyone and everything benefits!

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